Posts tagged with: Repo-Market

The surging demand for repo liquidity – and massively expanded bailout facility size by the New York Fed – suggests there is a major global scramble for USD funding, and today’s price action in the archaic money markets exposes it...
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With credit and funding markets starting to show signs of extreme stress, signaling a major dollar shortage…...
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Back in December, the BIS laid out a stunning, and heretofore unknown assessment of the factors leading into the September repocalypse: not only was the overnight repo surge to 10% a function of supply (or lack thereof), with banks – primarily JPMorgan –...
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Another overnight coronavirus related scare as China had to greatly up its estimates of the infected, yet no worries, the market remains as much on autopilot as the Fed remains in denial about how their actions drive market behavior....
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Stocks broke the uptrend (blue line) last week. They only just held critical support (red line). Had they not, it would have been an absolute bloodbath,...
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At the beginning of December, the Bank of International Settlements, presented a formerly unknown explanation for the September repocalypse, one which in addition to a sharp drop in liquidity by the “Top 4” banks, was amplified by an imbalance in demand for...
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The Fed announced on Thursday it is adding another $83 billion in “in temporary liquidity to financial markets.” And, in a development that will surprise no cynic anywhere, the Fed also noted that it “may keep adding temporary money to markets for...
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Dear Reader, “Journalism is about covering important stories,” said one scalawag. “With a pillow.” A staggering bailout of the banking system presently proceeds apace....
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Uncle Sam is terminal, and the only thing that can be done now is to try and provide some comfort (via the Repo Market). Here’s what comes next…...
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With the federal deficit running 22% higher during the first ten months of 2019 compared to the same period last year ($800bn vs. 655bn), student loans and other federal programs which increase the Treasury’s overall borrowing are running somewhat lower....
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